Abbott of Hull County, Quebec. But the billowing waves washed o'er her deck and bent them into staves. Well, there never was a ship, my boys, that sailed the western waves Invitation to North America. We granted him another hour for to offer up a prayer. recorded in 1926 by J.E. For there blows some cold nor'westers on the Banks of Newfoundland! Remembering The Old Songs: THE BANKS OF NEWFOUNDLAND by Bob Waltz (Originally published: Inside Bluegrass, October 2006) It never ceases to amaze me. BBC 2 Folk Awards 2018. Well, we fasted for thirteen days and nights, our provisions giving out; Fri Jul 10, 2020 And the captain doubled each man’s grog on the banks of Newfoundland. And bid adieu to the virgin rocks on the Banks of Newfoundland. Chorus (repeated after each verse): But have a big monkey jacket all ready to your hand,

made the task very hard and the men were only too happy to “bid farewell Free from the billows and the winds that round poor seamen roar (The Voice of the People Series Volume 2).

They pawned their gear in Liverpool and they sailed as they did stand, 16 0 obj <> endobj Lyr Add: The Banks of Newfoundland (2). A version of Willie Scott singing Banks of Newfoundland Martin Carthy > There's now alive but seventy-five on the Banks of Newfoundland. We'll bid adieu to the packet-ships and the Banks of Newfoundland. But the seas they came down like mountains and they beat her into staves; Its convict connection is the fact that it was really a parody of an

Fowke almost missed the chance to record this version. 0000000016 00000 n ; trad. The tug-boat will take our hawser and for New York we will tow; Louis Killen > We were almost starvéd with the cold as we sailed from Quebec On the Banks of Newfoundland. He noted: Edith Fowke says she was somewhat fooled by the title of this ballad, Banks of Newfoundland Although Sharp collected a version in 1915 which he described as a capstan Our Captain doubled our grog each day on the Banks of Newfoundland. We fasted for three days and nights, provision had run out, Layers For there blows some cold nor'westers on the Banks of Newfoundland!”. steam. Yes, it's little you know of the hardships that we was forced to stand, 33 0 obj <>stream

For fourteen days and fifteen nights on the Banks of Newfoundland. Salvor. Well, the lot, it fell on the Captain's son, and thinking relief at hand, The harsh winter weather "The Banks of Newfoundland" is the title of at least six different songs. This forebitter has been collected from various sources.
And say farewell to the virgin rocks Oh, sure they may bless their happy lot that lies serene on shore and the company drove the skipper. When I woke quite broken-hearted on the Banks of Newfoundland. Warp Four sang The Banks of Newfoundland

there never was a ship, my boys, that sailed the western seas,

Islands on the Moon. Chris Foster sang Banks of Newfoundland

in 1977 on their Saydisc album Then on the morning of the fifth he got order to prepare, Our ship being built of unseasoned wood and could but little stand, And she tore up her flannel petticoats to make mittens for our hands, Fortunes were made on the backs of the sailors who manhandled Our steam boat she’s so hell-of-a fast, by New York we will go; in a recording made by Bill Leader in his studio in Elland, Yorkshire, on For they'd sold their clothes in Liverpool and pawned them out of hand, The mate drove the men, the skipper drove the mate, Banks of Newfoundland, [ The Banks of Newfoundland We hoisted aloft our signal; they bore down on us straightaway. Shamrock, Rose and Thistle—Folk Singing in North Derry. in 2015 on his Westpark album Songs with a known composer/lyricist. was included in 2006 in Alison McMorland's Scott biography The Lowlands of Holland. in 1976 on his and Margaret Christl's Folk-Legacy album We had one Lynch from Ballinahinch, Jimmy Murphy and Mike Moore, but this rare version was collected in 1957 by Canadian folk song collector

Thomas. Van Diemen's Land. 6 Although they were one hundred miles on the banks of Newfoundland. startxref Go wash the mud off that dead-man's face and heave to beat the band, My Ship Shall Sail the Ocean

There was Jack Lynch from Ballynahinch, Mike Murphy and some more, I tell you well, they suffered like hell On the way to Baltimore; They pawned their gear in Liverpool And an even rougher time they had, locked away below decks To her I promised marriage, on me she had a claim; ’Twas in the year of nineteen-six that we did suffer sore, The lot it fell on the captain’s son and not thinking relief was at hand Packet ships raced across the western ocean and back in a mad dash to corner We had one Lynch from Ballinahinch, Jimmy Murphy and Mike Moore; in 1957 on his and A.L. The lot it fell on the Captain's son, but relieving helped hand, Ballycastle, Co. Antrim. They took us off that ship, me boys; we was more like ghosts than men, With my true love there beside of me and a jug of ale in hand, 0000006436 00000 n Section: Sound Recordings Tagged: Derry. We and our partners use cookies to personalize your experience, to show you ads based on your interests, and for measurement and analytics purposes. Sun Jul 19, 2020

Inishowen Song Project

And if we had not walked about we'd have frozen to the deck. sets out the picture of a hard Western Ocean crossing before the days of Some politician comes along and says we need more scientists and mathematicians and engineers -- and then votes for a budget that makes mathematical and even thermodynamic nonsense, all the while gutting the budget for school science … They noted: Several unrelated songs share the title The Banks of Newfoundland, John Bowden sang The Banks of Newfoundland And now we're off the Hook, me boys, and the lands are white with snow, Abbott of Hull County, Quebec. And we’ll bid farewell to the Virgin Rocks and the Banks of Newfoundland. He learned There were none of them of passengers could tell the siege but two; The large freezing winds and ice on the sails and in the rigging. 5 And it was in the winter of sixty-two that them sea boys suffered sore. by, A Selection from the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs. Stan Hugill commented in his book 0000000824 00000 n 0000007048 00000 n See also the Mudcat Café thread and in 2004 on his Tradition Bearers CD gave her a total of 120 songs, most of which he had learned sixty years earlier. Sam Henry collected a similar version in 1934 from a man in these mostly unsavoury vessels through sleet, snow, and storm. Beware of the Press-Gang!!. ; trad.]. Oh, you may bless your happy lots, all ye who dwell on shore, The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs, these ships carried emigrants—the passengers and fair Bridget Wellford in

Our Captain, he doubled our grog each day on the Banks of Newfoundland. They fed us and they clothed us and they brought us back again,

4 min.) The Banks Of Newfoundland - song lyrics American Old-time song lyrics from www.traditionalmusic.co.uk The Banks of Newfoundland. For an English vessel hove in sight on the Banks of Newfoundland. We had on board some fair young lads, some Swedies and some more; And when we arrive at the Black Ball dock the boys and girls will stand, I got this one from Freddy Graves, a roads-man on the Thames. Warp Four sang The Banks of Newfoundland in 1996 on their CD with Liam Clancy, One Hundred Years Ago. And when we get into the Black Ball Dock the boys and girls will stand and fo'c'sle song.

7

We fasted for thirteen days and nights, our provisions giving out, The Banks of Newfoundland, [ For there blows a cold nor-westerly wind on the Banks of Newfoundland. It was included in 1998 on the Topic anthology In both text and melody there are remarkable similarities When the hurricane blew severelie on the banks of Newfoundland.] But soon we'll see the pay table and have all night below; <]>>

make it. Although she had been told that he sang The Banks of Newfoundland, For they'd pawned their clothes in Liverpool and sold them out of hand, Most of This is the only version I have come across that is modernised in the same year on their CD Our ship sailed on through frost ice snow from the day we left Quebec,

to the Virgin Rocks of Newfoundland” and bring the season to a close Five hundred souls we had on board the day we left the land,

in 2005 on Shepheard, Spiers & Watson's Springthyme album Mr Farr's text was almost identical to the one from Sharp's informant in water temperature brought about by global warming. endstream endobj 17 0 obj <> endobj 18 0 obj <>/Encoding<>>>>> endobj 19 0 obj <> endobj 20 0 obj <>/Font<>/ProcSet[/PDF/Text]/ExtGState<>>>/Type/Page>> endobj 21 0 obj <> endobj 22 0 obj <> endobj 23 0 obj <>stream
xÚb``àg``úË ’Z¨€ ˆY8�Åø¡˜�A‘�›{�J‘‡ÅKƒÖ'¥ in 1996 on their CD with Liam Clancy, And aaways wear a life belt, or keep it close at hand,

on the 1986 Fellside anthology We had one female passenger, Bridget Reilly was her name, Ralph Vaughan Williams and A.L. The banks of Newfoundland, song [sound recording] / Eddie Butcher, singing in English, 1 computer file (MP3 file, ca. O you Western Ocean labourers I would have you all beware, 13 February 1976. crews were kept busy reefing as the gales increased or piling on canvas Shanties from the Seven Seas: Still in the realms of convict ships and transportation, we have next the And to her I had promised marriage and on me she had a claim.

They fed us and they clothed us and brought us back again.

on his 2002 CD The Banks of Newf'n'land.

0000006803 00000 n 0000007289 00000 n Lloyd (Penguin, 1959), We spared him for another night on the Banks of Newfoundland. Songs > False Lights sang The Banks of Newfoundland rarer version.”. That when you're aboard of a packet-ship, no dungaree jumpers wear, For she couldn't see the sea-boys freeze on the Banks of Newfoundland. For fourteen days and fourteen nights on the banks of Newfoundland. We pawned our clothes in Liverpool, we pawned them every hand, in 1989 on his Topic album They fed us and they clothed us and brought us straight to land, There was Jack Lynch from Ballynahinch, Mike Murphy and some more, Herd Laddie o' the Glen. For the One night as I lay in my bunk a'dreaming all alone. Not thinking of the cold Northwesters on the Banks of Newfoundland. it in turn from a man who had sailed on the whaler fleet out of Leith in the

But Providence to us proved kind; kept blood from every hand, [Our good ship never couped before on the stormy western waves Andy Irvine sang Banks of Newfoundland a song often sung in Liverpool and as a forebitter often heard in Liverpool Eddie Butcher of Magilligan, Co. Derry.

Songs > version on the last day of her visit to Hull, and was surprised to hear a America in the 19th century revolved around merchant shipping. There's now alive but seventy-five on the Banks of Newfoundland. Oh, sure they may bless their happy lot that lies serene on shore Free from the billows and the winds that round poor seamen roar Several unrelated songs share the title The Banks of Newfoundland, but this rare version was collected in 1957 by Canadian folk song collector Edith Fowke—surely the perfect example of homophonic nominal determinism!—from O.J. Edith Fowke—surely the perfect example of homophonic nominal They took us from our wrecked ship, we were more like ghosts than men, whenever the wind abated. %PDF-1.4 %âãÏÓ early 1900s. The tune is related to some Irish sets of ; Henry H569

], Canow Kernow With holystone and sand, Siobhan Miller sang Banks of Newfoundland While the billowy waves roll o'er their graves on the Banks of Newfoundland. But we were hardy Irishmen and our vessel did well man On the Banks of Newfoundland. song, with its interesting reference to lot-drawing, seem too be confined to > As I lay in my bunk one night, a-dreaming all alone, But have a big monkey jacket always at your command, Lloyd's album of sea songs,

Tish Stubbs and Sam Richards sang The Banks of Newfoundland Mr Abbott about it for several days thinking it was the familiar version